6 super quick (and free) mini-stocking patterns to knit

Happy Wednesday. I hope your week is going well. This is a repost from 2017 (time flies!) that is for the holiday knitters — a review of 6 different mini-stocking patterns for your holiday crafting pleasure. These patterns are all free, knit up in a pinch, and as far as I’ve checked, are still available on Ravelry (save for #6 which was taken from a book). Enjoy!


The past week has found me getting my holiday knit on, combing through Ravelry’s collection of mini-stocking patterns and trying my hand at a few. My usual writing table has been temporarily transformed into a workshop strewn with yarny bits, coloured pencils, the odd DPN, and darning needles which tend to roll into their favourite hiding place: under all of the other mess. I now appreciate the true meaning of trying to find a needle in a ribbon-paper-and-tape stack.

But. If you’re pressed for time and are looking for a last-minute holiday knit, I’ve found that mini-stockings work well. The patterns are easy and can be worked + finished up in an evening (I am a slower knitter, so the speedy-stitchers among you could zip one off in no time).

The Patterns

I worked 6 different patterns.

sock FO 3 -
stocking 5.jpg

1) Gemma Towns’ Mini Christmas Stockings  turned out to be my favourite pattern of the lot. Striping, a contrast colour on the cuff, heel and toe, and ample space for stuffers — what’s not to like? Worked on DPNs, the heel is shaped through a series of short rows. Quick Kitchener-stitch to graft that toe. Easy peasy.

2) Kat Mcab’s Small Holiday Stockings are a fun take on the mini-stocking, and they knit up really fast with minimal finishing. The stocking is worked in the round and is shaped with a set of increases. The simplicity of this pattern allows you to personalize or customize it easily. Only the bottom of the stocking requires a quick seam: a kitchener stitch graft or a 3-needle bind-off.

3) Jean Greenhowe’s pattern for Mini Christmas Stockings is worked flat. The stocking is shaped through increases, and the seam is sewn up the ‘back’ (the right side of the ornament in the picture). I thought that this pattern made for the most traditional ‘stocking’ shape, but am discovering that I’m a bigger fan of DPNs than I am of seams! This pattern walks you through different variations for colours and striping.

4) Juliet Bernard’s Christmas Stockings are quite special: worked on DPNs, they feature a ribbed cuff, some variations of easy colour work to choose from, and a full slip-stitched heel and gusset. If you’re looking to bring some 3-D sock-realism to your holiday decor, this pattern is it!

mini stockign WIP.png
Gusset realness!

5) Beverly Leestma’s Mini Knit Stockings are worked flat, include short-rows for heel-shaping, and are seamed along the front of the stocking. This pattern produced the tiniest of the stockings (a mere 2.5″ from heel to cuff when using worsted weight and size 6 US needles). The pattern has variations for striping and working heel & toe contrast colours.

…and 6) comes from the pages of Joelle Hoverson’s Last-Minute Knitted Gifts(2004) – the Sweater and Stocking Minis pattern. True to its word, the book provides a range of 11th-hour knits. This one is under the category of “2-hour projects.” It knit up so fast, I was able to finish the stocking in the library and did not need to bring the pattern book home with me (there is a lovely room in the library with a high, domed ceiling, a real fireplace, and huge windows that let all the light in. It is perfection for knitting). This one knit up the lumpiest, though – my mistake: the heel uses a few yarn-overs during the short-rows and my attempt to close up all the holes while finishing up left some bumps in the fabric. Lesson learned.

…and I-Cord Hangers

When attaching hangers to the stockings, I first tried a crochet slip-stitch chain, but found this flimsy and shapeless (see stocking #2 above). What my heart desired (and what it got) was an i-cord loop. I-cords are so much fun to make! They make for a very sturdy hanging loop for heavier things, too (if you’re interested, you’ll find a tutorial for making a 2-colour i-cord at the end of the post).

For each ornament, I worked a 2-colour 4-stitch i-cord on size 2 DPNs, then sewed the ends together to make a loop.

I-cord composite
Making an I-cord: just 4-stitches slid along a DPN produces a sturdy column of stockinette.

I attached the loops to the stocking corners, and with that, a first batch of stockings was ready!

ornaments 3.jpg

What do you think of these different patterns? Are you putting in the last stitches on a project or two? I hope that this week finds you warm and well, and recharging your holiday energies wherever and whenever you can.

Knit stockings at the Fête de l’Escalade

Today is a special day in the Swiss canton of Geneva.

This weekend, Geneva commemorates the Escalade (“the climb”), or the military victory against the Duke of Savoy’s attempt to seize the independent city-state in a surprise attack in 1602.

Coinciding with the holiday season, the Escalade celebrates Genevan independence – a spirit still very much alive in the canton. Street celebrations include mulled wine, battle re-enactments, a huge bonfire, and a torch-lit, 800-person procession through the cobble-stoned Old Town staged by Geneva’s Compagnie de 1602, the historical society of the Escalade.

The day is also steeped in history-making through story-telling. When I attended the celebrations in 2013, I remember overhearing a man in a café tell his children, for instance, the triumphal tale of Mère Royaume, the (fictional?) legendary local cook who warded off the Savoyard troops scaling Geneva’s city walls by pouring down a full cauldron of steaming hot vegetable soup (!), causing enough commotion to rouse the sleeping city in time to defend against the invaders. This is why, by early December, the Genevan chocolatiers fill their shop-windows with displays of le marmite – a chocolate cauldron filled with colourful marzipan veggies. This little soup pot has become a kind of edible emblem for the Escalade celebrations, and is broken to bits and relished at the opportune moment, like this Genevan duo below.

Chocolate-thoughts aside, I recently found myself looking through some of my old Escalade photos taken in 2013, when I lived in the city for research and to visit family. Specifically, my eye couldn’t help but be drawn to the very bright knit stockings worn by the musketeer and pikemen re-enactors. I wonder: did early 17th century Genevan troops really defend Geneva donning these playful palettes and colourful hosiery?

escalade1

escalade-2

escalade-3

escalade-4
I remember that it was a very cold day. The stockings looked up to the task.

It turns out, the Compagnie de 1602 acknowledges that there are colours and ornaments in the costumes that do not reflect the military uniforms of the early 17th century, shaped as they were by Geneva’s sumptuary laws – moral codes, in the spirit of the Protestant Reformation, intended to curtail the use and display of luxuries, including certain kinds and colours of fabric. In Calvin’s Geneva, I assume, hot pink might have been a no-go.

I dug a little deeper. I learned that the majority of the current costumes were made in the 1950s, and were inspired not by historically documented costumes but by a series of relatively recent paintings – the watercolour illustrations of Swiss artist Édouard Elzinger for the 1915 book, Nuit de l’Escalade (The Night of the Escalade). Elzinger’s own renderings of the soldiers’ 17th century uniforms was influenced by early 20th century Escalade costumes and Flemish painting.

elzinger
Bright stockings in Elzinger’s colourful aquarelle, La Nuit de l’Escalade (1915).           © Musées d’art et d’histoire de Genève

So, it seems, the costumes – like all practices of history-making – are a mix of the old with a dash of creative re-imagination. These stockings make me want to get my double-pointed needles and make a new pair of knee socks.

More 2013 Escalade snaps below.

escalade 6.jpgescalade-5

escalade 7.jpg

img_0575

Bonne fête de l’Escalade!

Meanwhile, back in Chicago… (lots) more snow today and yesterday.

IMG_2781 (2).JPG

 

*Rosenblatt, Helena. 1997. Rousseau and Geneva: From the First Discourse to The Social Contract, 1749-1762. 

**http://www.wikiwand.com/fr/Compagnie_de_1602#/Notes