6 super quick (and free) mini-stocking patterns to knit

Happy Wednesday. I hope your week is going well. This is a repost from 2017 (time flies!) that is for the holiday knitters — a review of 6 different mini-stocking patterns for your holiday crafting pleasure. These patterns are all free, knit up in a pinch, and as far as I’ve checked, are still available on Ravelry (save for #6 which was taken from a book). Enjoy!


The past week has found me getting my holiday knit on, combing through Ravelry’s collection of mini-stocking patterns and trying my hand at a few. My usual writing table has been temporarily transformed into a workshop strewn with yarny bits, coloured pencils, the odd DPN, and darning needles which tend to roll into their favourite hiding place: under all of the other mess. I now appreciate the true meaning of trying to find a needle in a ribbon-paper-and-tape stack.

But. If you’re pressed for time and are looking for a last-minute holiday knit, I’ve found that mini-stockings work well. The patterns are easy and can be worked + finished up in an evening (I am a slower knitter, so the speedy-stitchers among you could zip one off in no time).

The Patterns

I worked 6 different patterns.

sock FO 3 -
stocking 5.jpg

1) Gemma Towns’ Mini Christmas Stockings  turned out to be my favourite pattern of the lot. Striping, a contrast colour on the cuff, heel and toe, and ample space for stuffers — what’s not to like? Worked on DPNs, the heel is shaped through a series of short rows. Quick Kitchener-stitch to graft that toe. Easy peasy.

2) Kat Mcab’s Small Holiday Stockings are a fun take on the mini-stocking, and they knit up really fast with minimal finishing. The stocking is worked in the round and is shaped with a set of increases. The simplicity of this pattern allows you to personalize or customize it easily. Only the bottom of the stocking requires a quick seam: a kitchener stitch graft or a 3-needle bind-off.

3) Jean Greenhowe’s pattern for Mini Christmas Stockings is worked flat. The stocking is shaped through increases, and the seam is sewn up the ‘back’ (the right side of the ornament in the picture). I thought that this pattern made for the most traditional ‘stocking’ shape, but am discovering that I’m a bigger fan of DPNs than I am of seams! This pattern walks you through different variations for colours and striping.

4) Juliet Bernard’s Christmas Stockings are quite special: worked on DPNs, they feature a ribbed cuff, some variations of easy colour work to choose from, and a full slip-stitched heel and gusset. If you’re looking to bring some 3-D sock-realism to your holiday decor, this pattern is it!

mini stockign WIP.png
Gusset realness!

5) Beverly Leestma’s Mini Knit Stockings are worked flat, include short-rows for heel-shaping, and are seamed along the front of the stocking. This pattern produced the tiniest of the stockings (a mere 2.5″ from heel to cuff when using worsted weight and size 6 US needles). The pattern has variations for striping and working heel & toe contrast colours.

…and 6) comes from the pages of Joelle Hoverson’s Last-Minute Knitted Gifts(2004) – the Sweater and Stocking Minis pattern. True to its word, the book provides a range of 11th-hour knits. This one is under the category of “2-hour projects.” It knit up so fast, I was able to finish the stocking in the library and did not need to bring the pattern book home with me (there is a lovely room in the library with a high, domed ceiling, a real fireplace, and huge windows that let all the light in. It is perfection for knitting). This one knit up the lumpiest, though – my mistake: the heel uses a few yarn-overs during the short-rows and my attempt to close up all the holes while finishing up left some bumps in the fabric. Lesson learned.

…and I-Cord Hangers

When attaching hangers to the stockings, I first tried a crochet slip-stitch chain, but found this flimsy and shapeless (see stocking #2 above). What my heart desired (and what it got) was an i-cord loop. I-cords are so much fun to make! They make for a very sturdy hanging loop for heavier things, too (if you’re interested, you’ll find a tutorial for making a 2-colour i-cord at the end of the post).

For each ornament, I worked a 2-colour 4-stitch i-cord on size 2 DPNs, then sewed the ends together to make a loop.

I-cord composite
Making an I-cord: just 4-stitches slid along a DPN produces a sturdy column of stockinette.

I attached the loops to the stocking corners, and with that, a first batch of stockings was ready!

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What do you think of these different patterns? Are you putting in the last stitches on a project or two? I hope that this week finds you warm and well, and recharging your holiday energies wherever and whenever you can.

The road lace traveled

Hello friends, makers, and creators of WordPress. After a 3 month hiatus from blogging, I’m hoping to get a semi-regular posting habit going again. Although I haven’t been as active blog-wise this year, I have been reading and enjoying your posts. Your collective creativity sustained my imagination during my own blogging dry spell, and reading your stories and updates inspires me to come back to making, reflecting, and writing again — the lather, rinse, repeat of creativity (like, in a good way).

One happy update: earlier this summer, I tied the knot with my partner and best friend of 9 years! We enjoyed a sunny day and a simple, symbolic ceremony outside of Chicago on a grassy patch by a lake. We were grateful for fluffy clouds across a blue Midwestern sky and the loving company of close friends and family.

So. While planning, one thing I definitely wanted to do for the day was to wear a handmade garment. Having read about traditions of lace-making in The Book of Haps a year ago, my mind was full of lace-shaped dreams. I love the way lace catches light and drapes and moves and makes shadows. I was also resolved to take my lace skills to the next level. I decided, last Spring, that I’d make myself a shawl.

I chose a sport weight baby blue alpaca (as my LYS-lady said, alpaca’s got a natural “glow”) and selected a pattern that looked challenging but also possible for me: Jessie Dodington’s Dinner in the Eiffel Tower shawl. It’s a beautiful crescent-shaped cover, inspired by the famous tower’s criss-cross lattice structure. I was excited, enthused, pumped on wedding-planning adrenaline, and on my way…

© Jessie Dodington

But, because mistakes are inevitable…

I realized, early on, that I needed to devise my own way of dealing with lace-making mistakes in order to avoid past (disappointing) experiences of frogging-the-whole-darn-thing. With the later rows reaching 265 stitches, this became all the more important! Since the lattice section of the shawl relied on a pattern that repeated every 7 stitches, I “pre-knit” each row by weaving a line of yarn in between stitches to mark every 7-stitch repeat. This marking method helped me to “see” where each repeat was going to occur before physically knitting the row out. When I did, inevitably, make a mistake, this method also helped me to see where in the knitting the mistake happened, making correcting it 1000 times easier. It was time-consuming, yes, but this method was my own little eureka! moment of lace-knitting; it got me through the project and showed me that, with a little extra planning, more lace-making is possible in the foreseeable future.

As usual, when the shawl first comes off the needles, it’s a crumpled up, non-shawl-looking thing. The structures of lace come alive on the blocking board.

Pictures!

On the blocking board.
Out where lace loves to live: under the sun.

Just revisiting these pictures from earlier this summer fills me with a sense of lace-lover’s magic all over again.

Ok. That is all the news for now. Wishing you a restful weekend and an exciting, productive week!

Foray into Florals

If you’re like me, you’re accustomed to always having a “thing” in progress – a thing on the make at home, in addition to other quick things you can grab on the go (idle bus rides and waiting rooms, no more!). As we know, hands love occupation. When I sprained my neck last month, however, my long hours at the work table and monitor had to give way to rest and recovery. Even “easy” knitting and crochet were out of the question for a while.

I learned 2 things: I’m a terrible rest-er. Or, I need and thrive on the colours and textures of my beloved media. I think with my hands, and they need to intermingle hues and textures on needles and hooks. Preferably, on a daily basis. It was tricky, that no-knitting thing.

Second, though, I learned that we can adapt, and that new loves are always just around the corner. In need of some creative time, I picked my brain for a gentler, less tensing activity than fiber art – one that would allow me to enjoy colour and texture and form, but without too much muscle-work. And I found it: florals!

I went to Trader Joe’s and picked out a few things that caught my eye: a bit of white freesia, a smattering of baby’s breath, some Sweet William (for that wonderfully kinetic purple), sea lavender, and some sunflowers. Saddled with my bouquets, I took the train home during rush hour; navigating the packed-like-sardines train ride was a bit tricky. I crinkled and smushed a few buds, but everything arrived intact overall!

I laid all the stems out and started to think. Assembling a bouquet is a wonderful and gentle process – one assembles with one hand, and holds the stems in the other (gingerly at first to keep things loose and adjustable). My goal wasn’t perfect symmetry (flowers teach that nature is rarely perfectly symmetrical) but the vaguer criterion of ‘balance.’ For me, balance manifests as a wide open feeling of “ahhhhhh”: a sigh, in part, in relief and, in part, in the marvel of a new revelation.

I started building my bouquet from the middle outwards, beginning with a central cluster of sunflowers and freesia. I discovered, in the process, that the smell of freesia instantly opens the spirit right up (it does just as its name suggests!).

I thought it would work well to add a generous bit of Sweet William to the cluster. The colours seemed to delight in each other’s presences – a sign to keep going!

The sea lavender and baby’s breath followed. I wanted to emphasize the natural twinkle of the baby’s breath, so I kept it around the edges of the bouquet:

Before long, my hand was full – my cue to wrap it up. I took an end of ribbon from my container o’ scraps, and a bit of twine, and tied the bunch in place. I also trimmed down the stems. Voilà, a handheld bouquet!

I love florals! Working with them is relaxing and peaceful and healing. It’s energizing to create something with living things – each stem brings its own particular colour and structure and feeling to the whole. Each has its own little but beautiful way of being with the others, and the process of putting it all together makes the heart sing.

Happy Thursday to you. 🎵

Happy Mother’s Day

Dear Moms – you make the world go ’round!

Here’s a handmade bouquet for mothers, mother-figures, and any and all of the maternal energies that sustain us. 🙂

(and more on my little foray into floral therapy soon!).

Have a beautiful day. 🌸

Crochet: hints from Spring

Greetings!

Pardon my involuntary blogging hiatus. I sustained a neck injury earlier this month that saw me take a trip to the ER, followed by a ‘minimal screens’ and ‘minimal crafting’ regimen for a while (as a craft blogger, understand that this was not easily done). Things are better now, and I am slowly and gingerly healing up and getting back into the swing of things (thank you, pain meds).

After a truly magnificent blizzard swept through the city two Sundays ago, Chicago, it’s safe to say, has finally settled into its proper Spring-time weather: the sky turns that optimistic and clarifying shade of blue again, the sun is back, and so are those little mottle-feathered birds that perch in the bushes and on the eavestrough and fill the mornings with chirpy musings.

The hands have been busy — with extra vigilance of the neck’s temporary limitations. As they say, absence make the heart grow fonder — not being able to craft for a while only renewed my craft-itchiness, and when the time was right, I got back into my hooks! I’m taking a hint from spring in my making: all hearts and flowers and silver linings. Very much wishing you the same!